Archive for the ‘schindler’s list’ Tag

Coincidences No.s 290 & 291

I’ll come clean – the numbers on these coincidences are completely random, but I noticed yesterday’s one (No. 288)  was the same number as the one before that, which I wrote on 25th September (No. 288). Which is odd as on both occasions I was trying to chose a totally random number. Why would my brain pick the same random number on two consecutive occasions separated by nearly two months? No wonder it’s so hard to win the Lottery.

Episode-288

No. 290 Lance on the boil

I am listening to the boxing match between YouTube creators KSI and Logan Paul on Radio 5. Steve Bunce is co-presenting with Calum McDonald. Bunce gets McDonald’s name wrong, calling him both Josh and Lance. “Where on earth did I get Lance from?” he asks.

I turn over to Radio 4/BBC World Service. A man called Lance is talking about cybersecurity for robots and automated hotels.

ksi-logan-paul boxing

No. 291 Nazis on the loose

I am talking to Enfant Terrible No. 1 about a Holocaust denier he met travelling on a car-share journey to Bristol the night before last. He paid this dirtbag £12 to get a ride down there.

I switch on Spotify as we are talking. I’m listening to some album called Classical Chillout – I wanted something to write to. The track that it resumes on is the theme tune to Schindler’s List.

Schindlers List liam neeson

 

 

 

 

Labour of Lovechild – 4 reasons to see Inglourious Basterds

Mélanie Laurent putting on the war paint (see #4)

Mélanie Laurent putting on the war paint (see #4)

1 Once upon a time in Nazi-occupied France

A bravura opening sequence of some 25 minutes in near real-time a la Once Upon a Time in the West, part of the linkage of Westerns and War Films explored in Inglourious Basterds. Christoph Waltz rachets up the tension with his stand-out performance as the insidiously suave SS ‘Jew Hunter’ Colonel – as scene stealing as Ralph Fiennes’ Amon Goetz in Schindler’s List. The interrogation through chat is as good a dialogue as Tarantino has ever written.

2 Performances

As well as Austrian Waltz’s excellent performance which bagged him Best Actor at Cannes, Brad Pitt does a great – slightly cartoonish/Cormanesque yet highly compelling – turn as Lieutenant Aldo Raine, a no-nonsense Tennessee kickass (fellow native of Tarantino’s home state) playing the equivalent of the Lee Marvin role in The Dirty Dozen, pulling together the dirty Basterds to go kick some Kraut ass behind the lines in the run up to D-Day. He squeezes plenty of comedy out of the part, not least in his undercover I-talian.

Mélanie Laurent is also very charismatic as heroine Shoshanna, last survivor of a massacred Jewish family who takes refuge in Paris running a back-street cinema, resonant of wartime films like Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du Paradis. Inglourious Basterds is very much the lovechild of Sam Peckinpah and the French section of the International shelves of QT’s legendary video store. Laurent has a perfect deadened steeliness about her, an angel of death set to visit the Nazi basterds.

3 Bar room brawl

The second bravura talkie set-piece is a long sequence in a cellar bar culminating in a Mexican stand-off (worthy of John Woo). Like the opening scene, it is driven by interrogation through chat, the tension tautened to breaking point as a Gestapo uniform gets his terrier teeth into an undercover Englishman (played by Michael Fassbender, brought to prominence in FilmFour’s Hunger). The ebb and flow of tension is reminiscent of the Joe Pesci restaurant scene in Scorsese’s Goodfellas, with echoes of Hitch.

4 Putting out fire

As ever, Tarantino’s use of music is palpitating. The scene where the scarlet woman puts on her war paint to Bowie’s Cat People theme is a good reason in itself for the invention of Dolby. I’m going back to see Inglourious Basterds again just for that moment.

It’s a film which keeps you thinking after your initial somewhat bewildered exit from the movie theatre. It was good to see a bunch of Northern Irish teens having an animated discussion about the film as they sparked up outside the multiplex in Newry. I suspect this one will bear multiple viewing (probably more scene by scene than end to end, which says much about QT’s style of film-making) and like a blood red Burgundy get better with age.

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