South America Day 3: meat me in BA

storm at audio-visual district buenos aires

Wow, where did that come from? One minute I’m walking along with three charming lunch companions, the next minute the rain and hail is so intense I can’t even see across the street to the Audio-Visual District HQ in an old market building, open to the air. As previously reported, it’s Spring here and seemingly that means extreme shifts of weather. This time yesterday I was sunbathing on a stone seat – now I’ve ducked into a cosy but lively café, the Decata, with thunder and lightening punctuating the background music in here.

currywurst german sausage

Lunch was very enjoyable in a German-owned place which gave me the chance to switch from my Spantaliano to Deutschpagnol. My three companions were a young TV presenter-producer who fronts a show in Venuezuela, a fella from Colombia who loves punk (Pistols Tshirt yesterday, Clash today) and a translator-scriptwriter. They filled me in on the harsh realities of the closed economy here (pretty much the opposite of London and what makes it tick – advantage of being an island, where trading is second nature) and I felt their frustration at how it hemmed in their creativity, natural entrepreneurialism and energy.

This morning I went back to Mediamorfosis to listen to a session on multiplatform history by Alvaro Liuzzi. His project on the Malvinas conflict 30 years on was particularly interesting. Veterans joined in the Twitter narration by publishing extracts from their long-forgotten war diaries. A journalist found an undeveloped Kodak disposible on the islands and used the project to help track down the soldiers who showed up in the developed photos.

Next up was Robert Pratten of Conducttr, an East Ham man who talked through the very interesting and well integrated Twitter game he developed for Canal Plus in Spain for Game of Thrones. He had some keen observations on patterns around transmedia which were great food for thought. He, like me, places great emphasis on the centrality of the audience.

Damian Kirzner who organised Mediamorfosis is the long lost twin of my friend Jim Dwyer in Dublin. I’m going to make a point of engineering an opportunity for them to meet face to face. Damian pressed his two teenage sons into service as well as his good lady wife making the whole thing a delightful family affair, lovingly crafted. The two boys couldn’t have been more solicitous in taking care of dad’s Brit mate.

ernest hemingway writer at typewriter

The storm has somewhat bollocksed my planned flaneur activities for the afternoon so I’ll sit here Hemingway-like on the trusty Air (in my head a portable Halda) and rethink…

The Apple MacBook Air of its day (but with better battery life)

The Apple MacBook Air of its day (but with better battery life)

The solution was meat.

steak meat

Two and a half days in Argentina and no red meat. I had to do something about it. I headed across town with Robert and a taxi load of super-friendly Argentine women from Mediamorfosis to the Teatro Picadero where, beside a newly and beautifully restored theatre, warmly lit throughout, was steak. Not the stake of stakeholders and other arts jargon from subsidised theatre. Steak as in the two truckloads of cows I spotted on Day 1 coming in from the airport. We had dinner hosted by Marina Marchesotti, boss of the Picadero, along with people from the British Council, the Picadero and Direct TV from LA. Red wine flowed. A pile of meat duly arrived. The evening flowed happily.

teatro picadero sign buenos aires

A couple of things that have cemented themselves in my head today:

  • Argentines do a single kiss – consistently (no European double, even men do it much of the time on other men)
  • Argentines commonly have Italian names
  • Apart from the grumpy taxi driver on Day 2, everyone here is genuinely friendly and warmly welcoming.

teatro picadero buenos aires restaurant

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2 comments so far

  1. Sole on

    During lunch we were talking about how we need to cope with the idea that everything can change from one minute to the other in Argentina. Although we were thinking in economy and politics, rain was the perfect example on how our brain works. Four people in one corner: 2 Argentinean girls, 1 Colombian guy and our British fellow. It started raining. Rain got worse and automatically the 3 Latin people run across the street because they knew that as bad as it was, it could always get worse. Our wonderful British companion stayed in the corner and soon enough it was impossible to cross the street . “We’re survivors, we’ll always be” I thought while watching Adam getting into the cafe.

    Like

  2. ArkAngel on

    A good way of interpreting the scenario. My spin on it would be that whilst not surviving the trip across the road, I got to write in a cosy cafe and have a lovely hot chocolate, thereby not just surviving but positively thriving 😉

    Seriously, I do find the adaptability, enthusiasm and ingenuity of the young Argentinians very impressive – but more than anything, their warmth and openness.

    Like


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